CERN | Ian Bunn | Political & Popular Culture Arts Skip to content

Archive

Tag: CERN
Jason Palmer the British Science and technology reporter for the BBC News has published an article titled ‘Antigravity gets first test at Cern's Alpha experiment’, in which he states “Researchers at Cern in Switzerland have tested a novel way to find out if antimatter is the source of a force termed "antigravity". Antimatter particles are the "mirror image" of normal matter, but with opposite electric charge. How antimatter responds to gravity remains a mystery, however; it may "fall up" rather than down. Now researchers reporting in Nature Communications have made strides toward finally resolving that notion. Antimatter presents one of the biggest mysteries in physics, in that equal amounts of matter and antimatter should have been created at the Universe's beginning. Yet when the two meet, they destroy each other in what is called annihilation, turning into pure light. Why the Universe we see today is made overwhelmingly of matter, with only tiny amounts of antimatter, has prompted a number of studies to try to find some difference between the two. Tests at Cern's LHCb experiment and elsewhere, for example, have been looking for evidence that exotic particles decay more often into matter than antimatter. …the LHCb team reported a slight difference in the decay of particles called Bs mesons - but still not nearly enough to explain the matter mystery. One significant difference between the two may be the way they interact with gravity - antimatter may be repelled by matter, rather than attracted to it. But it is a difference that no one has been able to test - until the advent of Cern's Alpha experiment. Alpha is an acronym for Antihydrogen Laser Physics Apparatus - an experiment designed to build and trap antimatter "atoms". Just as hydrogen is made of a proton and an electron, antihydrogen is an atom made of their antimatter counterparts antiprotons and positrons. The trick is not just in making it, but in making it hang around long enough to study it - before it bumps into any matter and annihilates…”  Inspired by Jason Palmer, BBC ow.ly/laBDO Image source LinkedIn ow.ly/laBo8 Bumps into any matter and annihilates (June 11 2013)

 

Jason Palmer the British Science and technology reporter for the BBC News has published an article titled ‘Antigravity gets first test at Cern’s Alpha experiment’, in which he states “Researchers at Cern in Switzerland have tested a novel way to find out if antimatter is the source of a force termed “antigravity”. Antimatter particles are the “mirror image” of normal matter, but with opposite electric charge. How antimatter responds to gravity remains a mystery, however; it may “fall up” rather than down. Now researchers reporting in Nature Communications have made strides toward finally resolving that notion. Antimatter presents one of the biggest mysteries in physics, in that equal amounts of matter and antimatter should have been created at the Universe’s beginning. Yet when the two meet, they destroy each other in what is called annihilation, turning into pure light. Why the Universe we see today is made overwhelmingly of matter, with only tiny amounts of antimatter, has prompted a number of studies to try to find some difference between the two. Tests at Cern’s LHCb experiment and elsewhere, for example, have been looking for evidence that exotic particles decay more often into matter than antimatter. …the LHCb team reported a slight difference in the decay of particles called Bs mesons – but still not nearly enough to explain the matter mystery. One significant difference between the two may be the way they interact with gravity – antimatter may be repelled by matter, rather than attracted to it. But it is a difference that no one has been able to test – until the advent of Cern’s Alpha experiment. Alpha is an acronym for Antihydrogen Laser Physics Apparatus – an experiment designed to build and trap antimatter “atoms”. Just as hydrogen is made of a proton and an electron, antihydrogen is an atom made of their antimatter counterparts antiprotons and positrons. The trick is not just in making it, but in making it hang around long enough to study it – before it bumps into any matter and annihilates…”

 

Inspired by Jason Palmer, BBC ow.ly/laBDO Image source LinkedIn ow.ly/laBo8

Peter Ware Higgs the 81 year old UK renowned theoretical physicist for whom the theoretical Higgs boson (predicted existence of a new particle) was named, may well see his prediction evidenced at the Large Hadron Collider located at CERN in Switzerland. The Higgs boson is described as the most sought after particle in modern physics, and referenced by the media as the ‘God Particle’.  While on many occasions over the years physicists believed they have seen hints of the particles existence, but there has not yet been any substantive proof to confirm the elusive ‘goddamn’ particle’s actual existence. Higgs is not the only physicist to predict the existence of the particle as an important ingredient of particle physics, the non-existence of which would leave open the question of how particles would acquire mass. Inspired by Ian Sample ow.ly/4KAr0 image source Gert-Martin Greuel ow.ly/4KAqL Most sought-after particle in physics (May 5 2011)

Peter Ware Higgs the 81 year old UK renowned theoretical physicist for whom the theoretical Higgs boson (predicted existence of a new particle) was named, may well see his prediction evidenced at the Large Hadron Collider located at CERN in Switzerland. The Higgs boson is described as the most sought after particle in modern physics, and referenced by the media as the ‘God Particle’.  While on many occasions over the years physicists believed they have seen hints of the particles existence, but there has not yet been any substantive proof to confirm the elusive ‘goddamn’ particle’s actual existence. Higgs is not the only physicist to predict the existence of the particle as an important ingredient of particle physics, the non-existence of which would leave open the question of how particles would acquire mass.

 

Inspired by Ian Sample ow.ly/4KAr0 image source Gert-Martin Greuel ow.ly/4KAqL

Rss Feed Tweeter button Facebook button Technorati button Reddit button Myspace button Linkedin button Delicious button Digg button Flickr button Stumbleupon button Newsvine button Youtube button